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December 2016

Take a few minutes to give the gift of health and safety to yourself and others this holiday season.

  • Wash hands often for 20 seconds.image001
  • Bundle up for warmth.
  • Get a flu shot if you haven’t gotten one already. The best way to protect against influenza is to get a flu vaccine every flu season.
  • Eat a light, healthy snack before you go to parties to help curb your hunger and decrease your visits to the buffet table.
  • Watch your children. Develop and enforce rules about acceptable and safe behavior for using electronic media.
  • Fasten seat belts. Always use them, no matter how short the trip.
  • Don’t drink and drive, and don’t let others drink and drive.

Sourced from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

 

Everyone should have smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors in their homes. Carbon monoxide, or CO, is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death.

Three out of five home fire deaths result from fires in properties without working smoke alarms.

Take a few minutes to ensure your alarms will sound in an emergency.

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  • Install a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector near bedrooms, and make sure smoke alarms are near all sleeping rooms. Install smoke alarms on every floor of your home.
  • Choose smoke alarms that communicate with each other, so that if one alarm sounds they all will.
  • Check or change the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectors at least twice a year.
  • Test smoke alarms monthly.
  • For smoke alarms that use regular alkaline batteries, replace the batteries at least once a year.
  • For smoke alarms that use lithium (long-life) batteries, replace the entire smoke alarm according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Make and practice an escape plan in the event of a fire or emergency.

Sourced from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

image001Healthy kids are more likely to become healthy adults. Be a role model and help your kids make safe and healthy choices every day.

  • Buckle up every age, every seat, every trip.
  • Put on a helmet during outdoor activities, including riding bikes and skating.
  • Put on sunscreen and avoid indoor tanning.
  • Brush and floss teeth with fluoride to help prevent tooth decay.
  • Wash hands with clear running water and apply soap. Rub hands for at least 20 seconds, then rinse.
  • Get a flu vaccine. Everyone needs a flu vaccine – every flu season.
  • Be active with your kids. Children and adolescents need a total of 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • Be smoke-free, and protect your children from second hand smoke.
  • Be a healthy role model. Show your child what it means to be healthy.

Sourced from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health. People who are physically active live longer and have a lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Take a few minutes to figure out how to add physical activity to your life. Find something you enjoy, such as jogging or running, dancing, or playing sports.

  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator.image002
  • Park farther away and walk.
  • Walk the dog.
  • Take family walks or play active games together.

Sourced from Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

image002Immunizations are NOT just for kids! Regardless of your age, we ALL need immunizations to help keep us healthy. Vaccines reduce the risk of infection by working with the body’s natural defenses to help it safely develop immunity to disease. Take a few minutes to protect yourself and others from diseases.

  • Keep track of your and your family’s vaccinations as they’re received.
  • Make an appointment with your and your family’s doctor to make sure vaccinations stay up-to-date.

OSHA announced it is delaying enforcement of the anti-retaliation provisions in its new Injury and illness tracking rule to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers. Originally scheduled to begin August 10, 2016, enforcement will now begin November 1, 2016, according to the agency.

Under the rule, employers are required to:

  • Inform workers of their right to report work-related injuries and illnesses without fear of retaliation; Implement procedures for reporting injuries and illnesses that are reasonable and do not deter workers from reporting; and
  • Incorporate the existing statutory prohibition on retaliating against workers for reporting injuries and illnesses.